Archives For Creativity

I once had an advertising creative partner who loathed doing ads for P&G because they always demanded a demonstration of the product in action. My buddy felt that got in the way.

Apple on the other hand frequently uses “the demo” as the entire ad, not just a part of the ad. Apple and their agency TBWA are incredibly good at making the ad about the product, in a way that’s also all about the customer. In this familiar ad, which uses the same demo style as many iPhone and iPad Mini ads, it’s as if you, the customer, are using the product. Here, they sell, sell, sell by putting the customer first with these two ads that broke yesterday on their YouTube channel. The ad “Together” showed 11 apps in action. Uh, that’s a lot of demos.

It looks like some transit ads broke as well.

With 300,000 iPad apps to choose from, selling, selling, selling is a smart play.

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Walgreens just put this on Twitter. Brilliant. Walgreens

These are bourbon ball makers. It makes four ice cubes. Four huge, whiskey-loving ice cubes, just one needed per glass.

These are bourbon ball ice cube makers. It makes four ice cubes. Four enormously huge, whiskey-loving ice cubes.

It’s simple. Give away exclusive cool stuff, for free.

That’s one way how Maker’s Mark puts the customer first. This short video blog shows three cool gifts I’ve received just by signing up for the Maker’s Mark Ambassador Club about five years ago. It’s a really cool loyalty program that rewards customers with exclusive perks. The letter that came with the gift this year encourages folks to go to the Maker’s Mark Facebook page to “share the laughs.” (Although it doesn’t look like a lot of folks did.)

Word of Mouth.org calls it one of the best fan clubs of all time in this great story. They’re right. Maker’s Mark is making a huge number of fans feel special just by doing things a little differently. This disruptive tactic goes a long way to build not just long-term customers, but long-term fanatics. And hey, volume was up 16% for the first half of 2011 according to Nielsen. (See their entry into the Ogilvy Research Awards.)

Here’s Maker’s Mark website where people can sign up for the Ambassador program. And here are some neat photos from Maker’s Mark fans over at Flickr.

Young monsters looking for an excellent post secondary education should strongly consider Monsters University, says the beautiful new recruitment television ad. It’s a place “Where those who embrace their history become those who create it.” Potential applicants can learn more about MU at a nifty new website.

But wait – the ad isn’t meant to recruit monsters to go to a real animated university for real animated monsters. The ad’s job is to promote the Monsters University movie, premiering June 21, 2013. It’s a spot-on parody of the awfully scary, terrifying ads for colleges that we’ve all seen. Some are gouge-my-eyes-and-ears-out-awful. Hey Appalachian State, you are not, in any way, hot hot hot. Sorry.

But wait – the website’s job isn’t merely to sell movie tickets and toys. It’s to boost the whole Monsters franchise, which is smaller than Cars and Toy Story. The movie Monsters, Inc. will be 12 years old when the sequel comes out, so the website will give the whole franchise another thing for fans to talk about, which helps Pixar, which helps Disney. Oh, happy anniversary Disney. It’s almost seven years to the day since you and Pixar got married.

The Monsters University campus map.

The Monsters University campus map.

It’s a great website, spoofing education communications really well. At the Alumni page: “Seeking intern or employee talent? Don’t forget MU’s ‘Monsters Hiring Monsters’ initiative.” Easter eggs and surprises are baked in, and the writing pimps the platitudes of communications in academia. There’s a login feature, but it goes nowhere. Gotta be a tease for future functionality as we get closer to the premier.

Back in June 2012, this Monsters University trailer was released, but it was just a typical, average trailer, and the site was launched back in October to little fanfare. That’s a pretty fractured and boring release strategy. But this parody spoof campaign seems new, and really smart.

The movie is an animated cartoon for kids, right? But wait – the recruitment ad and the website aren’t targeted to kids. Hey, the recruitment ad broke during the Rose Bowl, which doesn’t exactly pull in the youth market. And kids won’t get the parody of the ad, or the website. Disney/Pixar’s target is old people, like me. The strategy here is “get adults into Monsters University.” That’s smart business. 

(Here’s a repost of a favorite video – a recreation of some great Blue Note album covers, from August, 2010.)

What a cool idea: take some classic Blue Note album covers from the 1960’s, and recreate them with live action and animation. What a big job.

Check out the original covers below.

The video was created by Bante to promote the Bellavista Social Club‘s concert season. Here is another wonderfully-designed music video he/she/they did.

It would be appropriate at this time to offer a four beat rest moment of silence for iconic jazz photographer Herman Leonard, who passed away this week. Leonard invented (accidentally) a style of side lighting for photographing jazz musicians in clubs that perfectly captured the feeling of the clubs, the players and the music.

Herman Leonard’s photo of Duke Ellington in Paris, 1958

Laser-zapped map chart art, from belowtheboat.com.

Laser-zapped map chart art, from belowtheboat.com.

See what happens when that the old school nautical map vibe gets together with talented laser woodwork supercrafters?

The folks at belowtheboat.com bust out really nice craftsmanship and detail that combines cartography, topography, information graphic-ography, Mr. Remke’s 11th grade Geography, and Great Lakes lunker hunter sweet spot-ography.

Great execution of these disparate -ographies help make a good idea become great.

Thanks Colossal.

This video is a from a really cool site, Brain Pickings. (Creative pals, bookmark it.) Click here to read and watch a great John Cleese creativity curation that Maria put up today. He quips, “Creativity is not a talent. It is a way of operating.” Love it.

Man, Cleese could read a recipe and be fascinating, but this stuff is also valuable. His “let your mind rest against the creative subject” is great. Have space, time, time, confidence and humor. Be creative.

The evolution of information graphics saw some cool highlights in 2012, and the New York Times does a great job of compiling and curating it here.  The famous 512 Paths to the White House which played out dramatically in real time in November, the patterns of where the Miami Heat and the Oklahoma City Thunder hit their shots, how an orchestra conductor’s gestures and patterns flow while jamming Stravinsky. Check the creative examples of visual communication and technology coming together.

Andy_Onion_copy

Simply looking at a chicken brings out the double chin.

Some lucky Wallmans were born with multi-chin powers, enabling us to conjure up a double chin with incredible ease. I simply smile, and a second chin jumps out from below the first and says, “Hi! I’m the other chin!” Breathing is much harder for me than making a double chin. With just a touch of effort, three or four chins can easily be summoned.

Three teenage daughters claim to be our children, and they keep my wife and I in a steady stream of text and social network communications. Recently at the end of a text exchange, one daughter texted me back an unusual emoticon face. It had two smiles. :)) I didn’t get it, and texted back “Huh?”

She replied, “It’s the smiley face :) Wallman double chin style :))”

Brilliant.

It’s a timeless chin. My father and grandfather before me were storied displayers of the multi-chin. Back in 1994, Scott Dikkers was the editor of the Onion in Madison. He knew I had a suit and tie, so asked if I’d pose for a cover photo. And lo! by tilting my head just a few degrees, even back in the 90’s, Chin II comes out to party.

Eighteen years later, we have a Wallbranded Wallmoticon. A family joke, told in three characters. A personalized punctuation picture that says a thousand words.

Proof yet again that the power of symbols beat words by communicating more with less.

Got any other examples of the personalized emoticon or personalized symbol?

(Here’s a great repost from earlier in 2012.) What a great idea – design the idea of Kurt Vonnegut’s master thesis. By Maya Eilam, a designer in New York City.

www.mayeliam.com